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A person standing in streamy waters fishing

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

We have put together some of the most common questions from our visitors before and during their visit.

Where can I find ATM's and do I need to have cash? 

No, since Sweden practically is a cash-free society. Internationally recognised credit/debit cards are essential, even for small value items. Many petrol stations are automated, especially in rural communities. ATM machines in Sweden are called Bankomat. You’ll find one in all bigger and smaller towns and they accept most international credit cards.

What is the weather like?

There is no such thing as bad weather. Pack for all occasions. It can easily be 25C with cloud free skies one day, and the following can be 10C and raining. It’s part of the attraction. Shorts and t-shirt are just as important as a rain coat.

What shouldn't I miss when packing my suitcase?

Always have swimming costumes available. A lake, beach or river nearby is often just around the corner. For those hot sunny days what could be more refreshing than a quick dip or a leisurely swim in some of Europe’s cleanest waters. A relaxing sauna coupled with a refreshing dip may well form part of the Gävleborg experience - an experience not to be missed!

Can I buy alcohol in Sweden?

It is no secret that alcohol licencing in Sweden is relatively strict. The state run off-licence, Systembolaget, is often only found in towns. They are not open on Sundays or public holidays. Reduced opening hours are to be expected on Saturdays and around public holidays.

Can I swim, hike, bike and roam around wherever I want? 

Yes, pretty much. When you travel in the Swedish countryside The right of Public Access (Allemansrätten in Swedish) normally applies. This law is unique to Sweden and protects every person’s right to move freely and enjoy nature. It allows you to walk on privately owned land, swim in privately owned waters and to pick wild flowers, mushrooms and berries. This law is one of the reasons why Sweden is such an attractive hiker’s destination. Nevertheless, there are rules to be aware of and follow; you are not allowed to harm land or property, you are not allowed to pick protected flowers and plants, you are not always allowed to light a fire or let your dog run free.